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Students...How do you revise?

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#1
devil*

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So I'm 17 and I'll have exams soon *sigh*, so when I don't spend my time at college on on et I usually have to study/revise for my exams.

Any other students out there who are sitting exams? Doesn't even have to be in this age group could be older or younger :P

How do you revise? what technique suits you best? I like to sit there and write out the key points of my revision guide depending on what bit I'm revising, then usually do past paper questions...or groan at it and go on et :D

I mean not everyone In this clan looks down on me as a minor, so if your out there come out and tell me your revision techniques- i'd love to know! 

 

p.s not revising doesn't count ;)

 




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#2
Koenios~

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For most exams I've had there are older exams available, which give an idea of how the exam approximately looks like, and also tests most of the knowledge required for a test. Looking at one of these can be very helpful, especially if you have answers of this old exam to check your answers with after you're done making it.



#3
Jobba

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As a computer engineering major, I found the best way to revise math is to do the one problem-three times or more. Also, reading over instructions on the how and why of the problem helps as well. I also watch youtube videos on the subject. That way the technique of how to do the problem sticks in your head and you can remember it without hassle.

For revising science, usually I like to quiz myself on the areas of a structure. The best way I've found to revise words it is to relate what you're learning to an experience or a stimuli, or word. For example, to remember what a self-fulfilling prophecy is, you could relate it to a time where you predicted something to be true, and it came true/did not come true. 

I hated English Composition with a passion. The only way to revise for this class is to just look and read over your notes, then think about how it applies to what you're currently learning in the class.

For other classes, I just read over my notes and use my textbook to reference and backup what i'm learning.



#4
Ophis+

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I just read and learn my notes then 1 or 2h later, i (re)do homework or/and i try to find some Quiz on google about the subject.
If i don't remember i read my notes again and re-try.

#5
Shana

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Play some et, go on break and read some notes, play some diablo, break and read notes. Should be good enough :D

 

Really simple once you get familiar with it, and you shouldn't have any problem with notes, focusing on et is the hard part :>



#6
!MX

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Even being a lawyer , I always have to study on laws and related right , I use a very basic method usually , it is configured in 3 steps: 1. I watch the video lessons on YouTube , 2. I read the book to clarify the ideas and 3. I make issues to fix in my mind, maybe this will serve as an aid , good studies .



#7
Pepperonipizza

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Hi devil, great question!

 

The best method for studying is highly dependent on you and on your subject! I.e., what works best for you (how does your brain remember stuff the easiest?) and what kinds of things are you studying?

 

There are several techniques you can try out and you can see what works best

  • Re-reading your material (silently or out loud)
  • Writing down a synopsis of your material
  • Listening to/watching people explaining it

What does your material look like? Is it something formal/science-like that you have to understand? Or is it a big list of things you have to remember, like anatomy or translations?

If you want to understand things, don't just read the material, question yourself on how it work and why it works the way it does.

If you want to remember stuff, then keep using one of the above methods periodically (every few days). Every time you read/watch/write something, you put it "better" into your brain for the long term.

 

 

What worked/works for me: I used to just read the book/course material and make a big, very high-level synopsis of everything (this would sometimes just be a list of the titles and sub-titles of the book). Writing stuff out also worked very good for me. If you haven't tried that, I highly  recommend you do it at least once to see how well it sticks. For me, if I've written something down, it's very well engraved into my mind.



#8
Anton Chigurh

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Start early, take your time and practise practise practise.

#9
Platonic

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  • Listening to/watching people explaining it
Great reply overall. I could add to that, if you cannot listen or watch to others explaining it because there are simply no records and your memory works well on aural stimuli, you can explain it to yourself and record your own voice. I passed some exams with success that way :)

Edited by Platonic, 05 May 2016 - 02:56 PM.


#10
Bon Scott

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In Brazil, to join on every university you need pass in exam, well, to study science socias(history, geograph, filosophy), I like to write all matter and re-read as I was teaching myself, now , physics, chemistry and math I like to remake exercise...



#11
ClareHaych- LoNeWoLf

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Tell somebody else about the topic as simply as you can. Keep doing it until it's like a story you remember. Watch little clips/presentations on the topic... And then just stress  :crazy



#12
JoNny

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I've never learned a lot. The BEST practice is to listen carefully in class and get what the teachers says. You're gonna remember some of what he said in a test and you'll be lucky you were actively listening and that you're not the guy telling other friends of your answers comparing them with their answers and you unfortunately hear them saying all the same exact answer which is not the same you have. ;)

 

For learning, I personally prefer learning shortly before the test begins (this doesn't mean 10 mins beforehand :D) but this is different from person to person. One has to start off weeks before the test is even announced and some would've already lost everything two days after they began.

 

When I wrote / spoke my finals, I used to learn only days before the actual tests. Maths for example was more complex so I started about a week ago (actively revising the stuff we had to know) while I was in practicing courses every single week (yes, persistence is important). However, I didn't learn a thing for my English final. As those are subjects that you basically have to know how things go it's obviously different to subjects you have to know all the things written down throughout the year(s). I had my oral exams in History/Social studies and Physics/Astrophysics. For either class I had my whole notebook with everything written down and I simply shortened it on the pc. By doing that (or writing - plus shortening - down everything again) you revise all the stuff already and writing is the best revision (compared to oral or whatsoever) you can have. Then I had about 20 pages DIN A4 for each class and learned from that.

 

And what did I get? Once 15/15 + 15/15 and on the other subject (combined) 12/15. I wasn't happy with the 12 points but it was fine in the end.

 

I hope you can benefit from that.

 

TLDR: Listen to the teacher carefully throughout the year and write everything down in a short version about 1 week (depending on the subject) prior to your test.

 

Regards and may you do well!

/JoNny



#13
Birdman

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It really depends what kind of subject you've got.

If you have math for example with these complicated formulas, you should just do alot of questions where you've gotta use those formulas.

If you have just alot of theory you should read the chapters you gotta learn for the test and write a summary with the most important points that you've came across whilst reading all the chapters, although this takes up alot of time, this is probably the best.



#14
Smultronstallet

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Some tips as historian. I don't know what you're studying, but it can be helpful to any other student reading this:

1) conceptual clarity (being able to use and apply concepts easily)

2) style (being able to write very very clearly.. avoiding any rethorics or narrow ideas)

3) read everything and write as you're an expert of the texts in question

4) Ppl thinks that reflection is just your own intuitive ideas :P, but in reality, is having complementary readings or not :P



#15
Daniëlle

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Most of the times when I have exams I read all my notes two times entirely and I also write things down. This helps me to remember it faster! I also like to read aloud and ask questions about the content. For my last exam I have discussed the subject matter with a classmate, this is very useful too! In general I take a pause of 15 minutes after one hour of study. This way works the best for me ;) 






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