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Over Clocking


Crimson
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Hey there guys,

Just wanted to ask if anyone here knows much about overclocking?

I know some basics and have overclocked before but, I am wanting to push it a lot further than what I've already achieved.

PC specs will be posted upon request for those serious about helping :)

Thanks,

Crimson.

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yeah alot of people overclock here. extremesystems or overclock.net would have more information on timings, voltages and everything else. Give us your specs and what you want to achieve and we can try to help. If you are fairly new to OCing i would go there anyway and read up so you dont fry your stuff

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I use Rivaturner.This is what Riva looks like. After you install Riva, open it and click on the "Customize" button by Driver Settings. A tab with some funny buttons on it pops up.

 

fkv7ld.jpg

 

Select the one on the far left that says "System Settings". This opens up the next window:

 

2u9k7wp.jpg

 

Check the "enable driver-level hardware overclocking" box. After it reboots, you will be able to use the sliders. The "Core clock" and "Memory clock" sliders allow you to easily speed up your computer just by moving these bars. That's it. Instant overclock. Never click "Apply overclocking at Windows Startup..." in case you move the bars too far and the computer locks up and you have to reboot. If you set them too far and you have this checked, you will not be able to use the computer again to go back and slow it down.

 

Here is my personal copy of Rivatuner: http://www.megaupload.com/?d=E6F633WT

 

Here is the newest version of Riva, which supports newer ATI cards too:

http://downloads.guru3d.com/RivaTuner-v2.09-download-163.html

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Geez we could make a huge tutorial on overclocking. Somewhere a 14 year old kid will fry his mom's computer. I had a gamer friend who had a water cooled graphics card pop the hose and spray water all over inside it, destroying it. A lot of PCs won't even let you in the right BIOS sections anymore, but there are a lot of overclocking addons that will overclock your mobo or your CPUs too. If you do go in the BIOS, use Arctic Silver on your chip(s) and watch your temp. Most PCs get fried over 65C.

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STOP... DON'T... :o

 

I always advice NOT TO.. unless you want the risk of burning you CUP...

most of ppl just think that overclocking is making your CPU faster.. but there is more to it that that.. for anyone interested i'll explain how it works

 

CPUs as everybody knows, work with 1s and 0s.. but those 0/1 internally are represented with electric current.. that is ALWAYS running

or else the CPU would shutdown like a normal appliance (BTW... that is what the reset button does.. cuts the power for 1 single cycle)

 

but since the CPUs got so small they work with very small voltage (about just 1 volt) so half of the voltage is 0 and a peak is a 1

like the image below shows

Overclock.jpg

the pink lines define a cycle.. the cycles are controlled by small crystals the when electric current is applied vibrate at a certain frequency.. every vibration the CPU checks the voltage to see if its a 1 or a 0..

 

But now comes the other part of the equation.. since CPUs are so small the internal connections are bound to some imperfections and impurities.. smaller than what you can see on a microscope but enough to limit the CPU, and increase is internal resistance..

by this I mean the resistance to electricity.. which means gets hotter as electricity run through..

 

and the more peaks(aka 1s) pass through the CPU, the more time we will spend with a higher internal voltage, which means more heat..

and you can see by the amount of grey shading...

 

now what ppl sometimes don't know, is that CPUs are made with a higher frequency crystal that the one they advertise..

that means that a 2ghz CPU has a 2.5 or 3ghz internal frequency.. but before they leave the factory they are tested for those "imperfections".. that means put the CPU to work (1s and 0s) and gradually increase the speed.. when the CPU starts to heat up means

that he as reached is limit.. and that those imperfections don't allow it to run faster (aka run more voltage).. so they cap the CPU and sell it as 2ghz.. which is the speed SAFE for the CPU to run in..

 

In resume.. when you overclock you are actually making the CPU run at a speed that he was tested for AND FAILED..

So unless Its an old machine with no valuable information in it don't take that risk.. and if you are thinking "Ill just do it cause if it burn I have the money to buy a new one".. them ffs.. just go out and by a new faster one...

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and if you are thinking "Ill just do it cause if it burn I have the money to buy a new one".. them ffs.. just go out and by a new faster one...

 

Well thats pretty much what I was thinking... lol, but why waste the money on the new one when I could possibly get the performance I am looking for out of what I have already got?

 

I have got some experience overclocking though, I have been running this chip at 3.6ghz for about two months now...

I think I will visit those forums some more help.

BTW.. I already use riva tuner for my graphics.

Also under load at 3.6ghz my chip never got over 53 degrees Celsius.

Ive stressed tested and completed 10 hours of orthos without fail.

I am running a thermaltake pro-water 850i kit, with added cooling blocks to the kit for the north end and graphics.

Crimson.

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