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The Gulf Spill

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#16
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Ya know im not the tree hugging enviromentalist type, but to read the above boils my blood what a bunch of greedy sacks of shit.


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#17
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" money, so they say, is the root of all evil today "......hey i should trademark that saying, i could make a fortune :P

but yea, the average citizen has no clue what their government does behind closed doors. and its number one concern is certainly not the people

#18
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I think the excerpt is not literal in its meaning, but is still significant to the Gulf Spill. That being said, the end is not near, worse is to come...

#19
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I think the excerpt is not literal in its meaning, but is still significant to the Gulf Spill. That being said, the end is not near, worse is to come...


I don't know but it sure is a creepy coincidence! I was raised to be a Christian, but I've never been very good at it (don't like rules or fairy tales, not even sure I believe in life after death lol). My grandparents did their best to indoctrinate me. Took me to church every Sunday, gave me a Bible, etc. I found Revelation to be the most interesting book of the Bible, I've read the entire Bible during various periods in my life when I was interested in it. Revelation was full of intriguing prophecies that scared me as a young kid, and to see things that I read about back then actually coming to pass makes me truly wonder if the Biblical prophecies are true. It's very easy to believe them when you see a blood-red ocean.

I think the earth is in the process of becoming unsuitable for life due to one species having gained the ability to dominate every habitat and overpopulate the planet with no natural predators to keep them in check. Not even viruses work anymore at keeping human numbers down. So we are basically like bacteria in a petri dish consuming everything and poisoning our environment with our own waste.

#20
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HUMANS ARE CANCER TO THE EARTH !

#21
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HUMANS ARE CANCER TO THE EARTH !



Sadly you are correct

#22
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We should start killing ourselves now. Who volunteers to go first? :rolleyes:


Nice job pointing out the various translations of that verse Phan. Interesting to say the least

#23
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Everybody is in line.. just wait for your turn .

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Everybody is in line.. just wait for your turn .


we're going in reverse alphabetical order ;)

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I blame Yoyo for the oil spill.

#26
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I blame Yoyo for the oil spill.


+1 same here. yoyo how could you?

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THIS IS FROM ANOTHER FORUM I AM ACTIVE ON, IT IS WHAT THE DAYTRADERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE SPILL:
(and no, I am not phantasm here lol).


Comments on 'Top Kill' 1.0 Has Failed. BP Is Now Trying Version 2.0
by Washington Register or Login to rate comments »

If markets have any kind of efficiency then BP must be a screaming buy. It is difficult to see how the news could get much worse for the company so, if that's what's discounted, then the only way is up. Add to that an extremely attractive valuation - close to 7% yield, PE of under 7, IV of 920p according to SocGen. And if you are still not convinced think how likely Exxon or Shell are to bid for a weakend BP. May 28 05:04 AM Reply +3-3 nobby73 Comments (612) nobby73 26

On the other hand, we still don't know exactly how much oil has been released, where it is going to go, the impact of the dispersants or whether the attempts to plug the leak will work. The overall damage and therefore cost to BP is still up in the air, and the Obama administration will make sure they spin this for political purposes. How this will effect BPs operations in the US is unclear, but it doesn't look good.

I suspect this will change the financial position of the oil industry in general and will be used as an excuse to raise taxes and other costs (the official line will be for environmental purposes, but then Russia used a similar tactic against BP to push them out of their far east operations, and it's really more about plugging deficits.)

In my view, if anything, the market has under appreciated the scale of this disaster (traders don't think about food chains, and dead zones and always undervalue the environment.) I may be wrong, but this does not seem an attractive buy to me.

The problem with your "bad news is already out" theme is that oil is still gushing into the gulf and no one knows how long it will continue. Eventually the pressure in the reservoir will subside, even without intervention, but when that might happen is unknown. The fact that this accident appears to have been caused by negligence on BP's part makes the actual cost when all is said and done, much harder to estimate. While the focus has rightly been on the ecological damage being done and the related impact on local fisheries and tourism, we have yet to hear from some of the players being punished by the BP caused government mandated cessation of exploration drilling in the gulf.

If you add the billions in business lost to the likes of Transocean, Baker Hughes Oceaneering Int'l and whole drilling and supply chain for deepwater drilling, not to mention increased insurance costs, lost opportunity costs to producers, investor losses (the list goes on and on), you can reasonably come to the conclusion that the total losses caused by this disaster are at present incalculable.

In short, the urge to place a bet on BP after seeing the mauling it has taken in the market is nothing more than that--it's a wager made against unknown odds. May 28 07:05 PM

omg why not use the "junk" in the mud the first time, i.e make 2.0 - 1.0 right off the bat....if 1.0 dosent work we have 2.0 which is better to try......fail May 28 05:35 AM Reply +2-4 Mmarrkk Comments (479)

Oh, so why didn't Microsoft release Windows 7 the first time instead of releasing the original Windows way back then?? This is emerging, leading edge technology that is being designed/developed on the fly (at these depths and pressures). You do something, find out what happens, react, improve, and keep moving forward. May 28 01:28 PM

On the subject of drilling under a mile of seawater,
when you don't know what you're doing maybe you shouldn't be doing it.




BREAKING: If Top Kill Doesn’t Work, U.S. Navy To Take Over Spill
Posted on May 26th, 2010 by macaoidh

Hayride sources indicate that today’s effort at a “top kill” of the Macondo gusher carries with it gigantic stakes for BP – as if no measurable progress is made on the spill through that method, President Obama will announce when he comes to New Orleans on Friday that the federal government will seize control of the response from BP and turn it over to the U.S. Navy.

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus has reportedly floated the idea of sinking a battleship directly on top of the Macondo well in order to drop 80,000 tons on it and crush the drill pipe and the blowout preventer alike.

We haven’t confirmed it yet, but that’s the word floating around Louisiana’s state capitol today.

Texalope Here; Drop a battleship on this mother. A Military solution. Wow LOL May 28 05:41 AM


I am a retired accountant, having spent the early years of my career in the insurance industry and the later part in the field of accounting. My insurance experience has given me the willingness to accept investment risk if I feel the return justifies it; also, an interest in applying risk... More Blog: investorplaceblogs.com/users/toma47/ Perhaps a device could be lowered onto the site, something that would produce very high heat and pressure, fuse the rock in the area and seal it that way.

I'm talking about nuking it. May 28 05:58 AM - Reply +2-8 john s. gordon Comments (3001) john s. gordon 42


That is what the russians would do. peaceful uses of nuclear technology.
probably the cubans jamaicans etc. would have some comment on this.


A neutron bomb is the obvious solution, which I suggested on Seeking Alpha a month ago. And as I said then, uninformed hysteria would probably make it a politically impossible move.

It's amazing however to contrast the media attention given to this American coastline disaster, versus the environmental disaster deliberately caused by the Israeli armed forces when they bombed Lebanese infrastructure in 2006, including oil storage facilities.

"An Israeli bomb attack four weeks ago on the Lebanese Jiyeh electric plant has polluted some 140 kilometers (87 miles) of the Lebanese coast, spread north into Syrian waters and has the potential to reach the coasts of Cyprus and Turkey, according to the United Nations Environment Program.

If all the heavy fuel from the damaged facility's storage tanks located some 50 km south of Beirut were to seep into the sea, officials said, the environmental fallout could rival the Exxon Valdez spill when 37,000 tons of oil devastated Alaska's Prince William Sound.

At a meeting Thursday with EU and the International Maritime Organization, the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) requested 50 million euros ($64 million) to contain the oil spill, adding that violence in the Middle East had kept them from being able to make an accurate assessment of cleanup costs."


Where is the public outrage? You wouldn't even know it had happened by studying the Israeli controlled news in this country. And people wonder why the Arab nations hate us! May 28 11:13 AM Reply +3-4 Chrisfs Comments (17) Chrisfs 0


I couldn't find your previous post, but it sounds like an amazingly bad idea. The situation is like a firehose and you are recommending a high explosive along with a pulse that will kill all life within a wide radius. I don't see how that will help at all. May 28 12:19 PM Reply 0-1 PaulTD Comments (110) PaulTD 3



Chrisfs,
I appreciate your feedback and I tried to include a link below to my previous comment.

The world is full of bad ideas. How about these:

Taking shortcuts while drilling for oil under 5000 feet of water.

Failing to plug the leak for 3 months while 100 million gallons of crude oil wash over the Gulf Coast.

Making a national economy dependent on an artificially low oil price.

A US president declaring that we have the right to violate any international law that we find inconvenient.

Ronald Reagan leading the world by having the solar panels removed from the White House.

Lending money to Greece.

Open-air atomic bomb testing (how many animals and people were killed by this?).

Attacking Iraq for nonexistent WMD' s while North Korea is in the process of acquiring nuclear weapons.


When my ideas are challenged, I ask questions. So I will ask you, what do you mean by "a wide radius"? 1 mile, 10 miles? Does it make a difference whether the animals are killed by ingesting crude oil or by a blast of neutron radiation? How many sea creatures do you estimate would be killed by a single blast as opposed to 10 years of exposure to toxic oil and chemicals?

The Atomic Energy Commission/DOD has conducted several underwater nuclear bomb tests. They have lots of data to predict effects and consequences. Obviously they would be better able to make a judgment about such an idea. I just hope that someone does something that stops the leak. If nothing else, a neutron bomb would leave a large crater which could conceivably be filled with something impermeable.


seekingalpha.com/user/...

sincerely,
PaulTD May 28 01:04 PM Reply +5-1 Buckoux Comments (620) "The Atomic Energy Commission/DOD has conducted several underwater nuclear bomb tests. They have lots of data to predict effects and consequences."

You know this how? And you have access to the results? May 29 12:42 PM Reply

So you appreciate my feedback but you reply with a bunch of unrelated questions. That's some strange appreciation.
The oil and tar is already in the water so it's not an oil or neutron bomb choice, it would be an oil AND neutron bomb. And while oil can be avoided or remedied, neutron radiation can't be.
If it leaves a crater, then there may likely be a large hole even more difficult to cap. I think this is a BS idea that you thought up without much consideration. We all have the luxury of not actually having to come up with something. May 29 12:45 PM Reply 00 PaulTD Comments (110)


"PaulTD: When my ideas are challenged, I ask questions. So I will ask you, what do you mean by "a wide radius"? 1 mile, 10 miles? Does it make a difference whether the animals are killed by ingesting crude oil or by a blast of neutron radiation? How many sea creatures do you estimate would be killed by a single blast as opposed to 10 years of exposure to toxic oil and chemicals?"

"Chrisfs: So you appreciate my feedback but you reply with a bunch of unrelated questions. That's some strange appreciation...I think this is a BS idea that you thought up without much consideration."

As near as I can tell, my questions were directly related to your comments. As far as my appreciation for your comments goes, it was not so great that I was going to send you a gift or anything, but I did appreciate that you took the time to write a thoughtful response, because I find these exchanges entertaining and sometimes enlightening.

I would agree that there is already a great deal of oil and tar in the water now, but there was not nearly so much 28 days ago when I first posted this suggestion. I suppose I could've just suggested that it's BP's responsibility and we should let them do their job, but that would be a pretty boring response. May 29 03:27 PM

"A neutron bomb is the obvious solution, "

I don't get the wisdom of that approach. A "Neutron Bomb" is intended to produce more "radiation" than "explosion". The neutron radiation will just pass through the sea floor and the well casing without causing any disruption at all. The neutron bomb was intended to penetrate armor and masonry to inflict personnel damage, not weapon or structural damage. What's your reasoning for this suggestion, or does "Neutron Bomb" just sound cool? May 29 12:32 PM Reply

"The neutron bomb was intended to penetrate armor and masonry to inflict personnel damage, not weapon or structural damage. What's your reasoning for this suggestion, or does "Neutron Bomb" just sound cool?"

Those are good questions. As with any nuclear explosive, neutron bombs generate considerable heat and pressure, just not as much as a hydrogen or fission bomb. But still sufficient to get the job done. The advantage is that they don't produce fallout. The fallout from other types of atomic weapons would indeed be disastrous and lethal.

And no, if it was up to me I wouldn't choose a solution just based on how cool the name sounds. May 29 03:41 PM Reply 00 Mmarrkk Comments (479)

Dude: do you know what is on the bottom of the Gulf at 5000 feet? hint: NO FREAKING ROCKS!!! Its muddy, sandy, silty. There's nothing down there to melt!

And all of these ideas are wonderful but will leave such destruction that if they don't work, you have no hope of trying something else! Melt it? What if it doesn't seal it? Now you have nothing to work with.

Drop a battleship on it? Can you spell FUBAR?? That sounds like something a government employee would come up with. Totally ridiculous. How about we drop a few Democrats on it and use them to seal that puppy up? Send Barney Frank down there! May 28 01:31 PM Reply +4-3 PaulTD Comments (110) PaulTD 3

"Dude: do you know what is on the bottom of the Gulf at 5000 feet? hint: NO FREAKING ROCKS!!! Its muddy, sandy, silty. There's nothing down there to melt!"

Dude, are you aware that sand is composed of tiny rocks, and is one of the main ingredients in glass, which is made by fusing (melting) the sand particles together? Heat that approximates the temperature of the sun has a remarkable ability to melt or vaporize any substance found on this planet.

You shouldn't have skipped all of those science classes! May 28 01:51 PM Reply +3-3 Buckoux Comments (620)

Even a small, <5kt., nuclear explosion underwater would be disastrous. The hydro-shock wave from such an explosion would be enormous and extremely destructive for hundreds of miles. If you want to be so daring, blast the blow out protector off of the casing and shove a large conventional explosive charge as far down the casing as possible to mitigate the hydro-shock of the underwater explosion. Then pray. May 29 12:23 PM Reply 00 actually a heavy cruiser would probably be sufficient.
if we have any left. contact the philadelphia navy yard & see what;s available.

The relief well will work but that is weeks away. Did you ever try to fix something and as a result the fix just made the problem worse? Well that is what BP is faced with only the problem is a mile underwater and they don't want to create a bigger problem that they absolutely can not be fixed. Apparently it is like using a garden hose to try to stop the flow from a fire hose.

Dropping a battleship on the leak sounds like a real moron idea. If that would fail you would have to remove an entire battleship to repair several leaks because it would burst the pipe in several places.
The pressure at 5000 feet is tremendous and that is the biggest problem. My solution would be to let the experts in the oil industry handle the problem and have the government get out of the way. The government should be the worker leaning on the shovel. BP should be the worker using the shovel, if you get the picture. May 28 08:52 AM Reply +6-2 john s. gordon Comments (3001)

I cannot believe the floundering around that we have seen in the last 6 weeks.
all because nobody bothered to do an environmental impact analysis & describe potential mitigating measures for what might go wrong.
thank you emperor george dubya for muzzling the regulators & making them ineffectual.
> jack May 28 09:06 AM Reply +4-4 dfbell Comments (736) dfbell 6

The live cam was showing the "plume" when the market opened. Obviously, they're worried that showing the actual leak will give them even more of a beating in terms of public perception.

Watching the plume doesn't tell us if the flow has slowed down. However, you can see golf balls in the plume. Clearly, they're trying the junk shot. There is a risk, because the supply pipe might clog; then, it's game over.

It doesn't seem like BP is being transparent. There's no way that there stock would have jumped 6% yesterday if people knew that the top kill had failed so quickly. Now, they're saying that they won't know if the "second phase" will be successful until Sunday. That's conveniently after the market closes.

In reality, they might not know if the junkshot is successful until Sunday. Nevertheless, they'll know, right away, if it fails: the pipe will clog. May 28 09:48 AM

They need to be inserting rolled up kevlar sheets to clog up the top of the bop and riser, but who listens to me....these experts are doing everything they can (sarcasm)....this is a perfect example of engineers, they cannot think out of the box when confronted with crisis. Any idiot knows that the open BOP was going to divert massive amounts of mud......sheesh. This attempt is looking more and more like engineering busy work and PR/BS than an intelligent effort. May 28 09:57 AM Reply 0-4 mythoughts Comments (55)



Is the high dividend yield sustainable given all the potential liability? My educated guess says 'no'. May 28 10:31 AM Reply +10 alphaG77 Comments (4) alphaG77 0

If their dividend is unsustainable due to the liabilities posed by massive government and civil lawsuits then I would think this stock has no where to go but all the way to 0. The reason being that the value of their equity or stock price is directly related to that dividend, so it will definitely be worth less than it is now. I don't think current price is incorporating the potential of a future dividend cut. Also, if they do cut their dividend it changes the character of the stock and many current institutional holders would have to dump it as it would no longer fit their investment critieria.

I'd much rather be long their debt with direct claims to hard assets. At least those will still be valuable to other Oil & Nat. Gas companies should the company sell them off. May 28 12:24 PM Reply +10 sethmcs Comments (657)

FollowingFollowAn Accountant who manages his own retirement. Well, Obama is in charge. What is he going to do. May 28 10:33 AM Reply +1-3 smartwidowlady Comments (58)


Enough! I'm busy. Offer the well a bail out? May 28 12:39 PM Reply +2-3 dgmcgill Comments (2) dgmcgill 0


I'm watching the live feed. I don't see golf balls anymore and they've shifted to views of robotic arms. I suspect that the junk shot failed and they're now getting ready to drop a container on the spill. Although, this is just speculation. May 28 10:37 AM Reply +10 john s. gordon Comments (3001) john s. gordon 42


(3001 comments)Send Messageixtoc (at 160 feet depth, not 5000).
1979 to 2010, no one seems to have learned anything in the intervening years. it took 9 months to get the thing sealed.
mud malfunction. has there been any improvement in mud technology in the meantime?
shear rams on the BO preventer aligned themselves with collars on the drillpipe, preventing shutoff. who designs these things anyway?
mexican government avoided paying damages by declaring sovereign immunity.
this time the well owner is a corporation, not a country.


It's amazing to find that everyone on this thread is an engineering genius of some kind or another. Too bad BP doesn't just hire all of you. I suspect it's like the SuperBowl, where everyone is suddenly a football expert. May 28 12:11 PM Reply +40 PaulTD Comments (110) PaulTD 3


One does not have to be a genius to think creatively. In fact I believe that BP has issued a call for ideas on how to stop the leak, and they did not restrict it to professional engineers.

Here's an example on creative problem solving. When I was a teenager, some of my brothers friends came by our house and TeePee'd a tree in our front yard. They drove around for a couple of minutes and then came back, and were shocked to find that there was no toilet paper left in the tree. How did I remove all of the paper in less than three minutes? May 28 01:37 PM Reply 0-2 smartwidowlady Comments (58)



How DID you??? I was never able to do it that quickly. Need to get the info to my daughter because her kids are getting to be that age. May 28 02:09 PM Reply 00 PaulTD Comments (110)


It was a medium-sized oak tree, green and healthy. I simply took a couple of matches and lit the different strands of toilet paper that were hanging from the tree. The toilet paper burned in a matter of seconds and the tree was unharmed. Naturally I wouldn't recommend this on a pine tree nor on any tree that was not green and healthy. May 28 02:57 PM Reply +30 dfbell Comments (736) dfbell 6

Yup, sounds like you have the qualifications, Paul.

Arrrrrgh ... May 28 03:44 PM Reply +1-2 PaulTD Comments (110) PaulTD 3

"Yup, sounds like you have the qualifications, Paul.
Arrrrrgh ... "

Actually, the people who have "the qualifications" gave us the BP disaster, the Valdez disaster, the Iraq disaster, the Afghanistan tragedy, the Palestinian Holocaust, the Vietnam catastrophe, the Korean police action farce (ongoing), World War II, the S&L crisis, the subprime mortgage meltdown, a worldwide depression, the SUV craze, draconian drug laws, $12 trillion of debt, etc.

We could have gone to war with Russia and caused less damage than the last five FUBAR's committed by people with "the qualifications". Of course that's probably high on their list. May 28 04:29 PM Reply +2-1 dfbell Comments (736) dfbell 6

And now that you have listed all that stuff ... are we closer to a fix? Or do we need to identify and spread some more blame around first? May 28 04:39 PM Reply +10 PaulTD Comments (110) PaulTD 3


Since you were so kind as to take the time to belittle my ideas (as opposed to listing possible solutions yourself, perfect irony), I took the time to defend them.

I have learned that the best ideas are arrived at by listing all conceivable possibilities and then eliminating those that are impractical. The people who are poorest at problem solving are those who belittle suggestions rather than contributing possibilities. May 28 04:53 PM Reply 0-1 smartwidowlady Comments (58) smartwidowlady 2


Enough! I'm busy. Thank you. However, I don't think I'll share this with my daughter after all. I don't know that I'd trust her to pick the right type of tree! May 29 07:45 PM Reply 00 Chrisfs Comments (17)

"You should forward your ideas to them and see what they think. "

I did just that. It was shortly thereafter that they began to discuss turning the problem over to the US military. May 29 03:46 PM Reply 00 Buckoux Comments (620)

"How did I remove all of the paper in less than three minutes? "

That's it! That's your claim to fame? Removing TP from your house when you were zit-faced! Look up the meaning of context in the dictionary. May 29 01:00 PM Reply 0-1 PaulTD Comments (110)


You might enjoy some of the YouTube videos of underwater nuclear tests conducted by agencies of the US government. May 29 03:53 PM Reply +10 bindlepete Comments (301)

At least some one other than a Brit is making some decisions. BP has a well deserved reputation for arrogance coupled with incompetence in Alaska. Why different in the lower 48? May 28 01:06 PM Reply +20 jimmyg1234 Comment (1)

we are told the leak is 170 atmospheres of pressure approx 5200 psi and the liquid oil is 300 deg f. does anyone know how much oil is in this pocket??? i heard their is enough oil to fill up the gulf of mexico!!!!!!!!!! yipes - this could be the armageddon of this century. May 28 03:36 PM Reply 00 smartwidowlady Comments (58)

Hmmm...what a waste of a good well, with all those bbls for BP. Should have been a dry hole, eh? May 29 09:34 AM Reply 00 bartpr Comments (362) bartpr 5

Any surface strtucture big enough to cap this would have to be huge and it will take month to build and deploy. i bet there is no answer to this now except for a relief well. any attemps to reenter the original casing would have been deployed by now. i bet there is no tech to handle this kind of problem because al thought the process was fail safe. i wonder who or what really failed. May 28 06:36 PM Reply 00 paynebb Comments (90)

If the government takes over, the well will spill until it is empty!!!! If BP cannot plug the hole, I assure you our incapable government cannot plug it. May 29 07:52 AM Reply 0-2 Nogbad Comment (1)

As I understand it while they were pumping mud very little if any oil was coming out. Doesn't this mean the problem is solved - I mean cant they just pump mud for 2 months until the relief well is drilled? May 29 08:26 AM Reply +10 john s. gordon Comments (3001) john s. gordon 42
Followers2
FollowingFollowindustrial experience in oil refining, energetic materials, electric utilities, pollution controls, coal gasification & liquefaction, hazardous wastes Commenter
(3001 comments)Send Messageif we can just keep pumping enough mud long enough we can fill up the whole GOM with mud.
mexicans can go live there rather than going to arizona.
> jack May 29 06:38 PM Reply 0-1 HippyJr6 Comments (8)

pressures upwards of 8000psi and they are thinking rubber chunks and golf balls?? with the methane hydrate explosion early on and the failure of the BOP it appears we don't yet have the technology for deep water oil production. May 29 10:33 AM Reply +20 Prune Comments (31) Prune 0
Followers6
FollowingFollowPrune has yet to provide a bio. They can build skyscrapers, WHY would it not be possible to build a giant tube. The tube would seal the entire 5,000 feet, the oil would have to go up, the tube could project above the water, the oil and some water coming out of the tube could lead to an endless procession of supertankers taking the oil away to a separation plant. Hmm, doesn't this sound like offshore drilling accomplished? Could this create jobs? Could this be an American success story? Could this be an Obama success story? Could this be better than rebuilding the twin towers? Can we believe? May 29 07:30 PM

The Russians used nuclear devices to seal oil wells but that was years ago. Technology has progressed and perhaps shaped charges could be used to direct the force to try and collapse the pipe. I have read that some areas in the Gulf have been used to dump military ordinance which could make an explosive "interesting".

Maybe load Napolitano in a torpedo tube and fire her down to "plug that hole". For once she would be some use to the Nation.

The administrations response to this has been dismal at best. There is going to be an oil soak Albatross hanging around Obama's neck on this one. The failure to mobilize the Corp of Engineers, National Guard or have meetings with representatives of all of the major oil companies to share information and help is a huge question mark.

I understand the last oil well leak in the Gulf, not this deep, where they tried all of these steps took nine months to shut off. This could be with us for a while and the first hurricane in the Gulf will make this very interesting.

And what exactly is the National Guard going to do? Or the Corps of Engineers? Neither is well known for their expertise in plugging oil wells in 5000 ft of water.

Heard a report on NPR the other day that there are 20,000 people working on this problem and that BP is using Shell's Gulf emergency center. All of the best people from all of the major oil cos are in that center helping out trying to stop this thing because all of the other oil cos are well aware that there but for the grace of God, go I.

If you don't grasp that Obama, Salazar, and Chu have already had long, in-depth discussions with the major oil cos about this, then you have no clue about any of this.

Oh, now I get it. You want the National Guard to arrest the oil!

#28
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That was a wayyyy long post.. felt asleep twice , before I could end the first paragraph :unsure:

#29
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That was a wayyyy long post.. felt asleep twice , before I could end the first paragraph :unsure:


Same here, and I only read every other one ..

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PHANTASM

PHANTASM

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Yeah, it was a long boring post. Sorry.

I thought it was worth copying (I don't usually do that) because there was a lot of ideas and news in there about the spill.

A lot of people want the US Navy to nuke the hole to seal the ocean floor. A lot of people think that is lunacy.

And apparently BP is having vastly more trouble filling the hole than they want anyone to know. Golf balls? Are they that desperate?

And other people are wondering what will happen to the BP stock, and the gas prices, and the US economy.




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