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Recycling

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#1
Matasanos

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Hallo mates, I´ve been long time concerned about global warming and all stuff about it, so, i started some mounths ago with recycling, and producing compost with vermicompost system... you can do it on your home, this is cheap, easy and dont smell anything if you do well...you can recycle carboard, paper, all vegetable sraps of kitchen, and leaves of garden.... If every one do something for fight the climate change, our mother nature will be better than we know these days...peace!!

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this is the first final compost:
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this is the second compost, but was infested with black soldier fly larvae, wich killed my earthworms, so i have to use tobacco water to kick those maggots...
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and this is the third compost, i have to cover with mosquito net... no more flyes :)
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Rainwater, helps to add nitrogen to the compost to make it more nutritious:
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Breading stuck for earthworms:
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#2
darkfang77

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Can you please explain how rainwater helps to adds nitrogen?

#3
Chuckun

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Can you please explain how rainwater helps to adds nitrogen?


There's really high levels of Nitrogen in the air.. Rain water will contain (at least traces of) nitrogen. It can't hurt. :) Ultimately, rainwater is what the earth would get to decompose bio tissue in the first place so it must be pretty good for it. Even at this stage of our planets shortened life, it still functions marvellously. :)

#4
darkfang77

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There's really high levels of Nitrogen in the air.. Rain water will contain (at least traces of) nitrogen. It can't hurt. :) Ultimately, rainwater is what the earth would get to decompose bio tissue in the first place so it must be pretty good for it. Even at this stage of our planets shortened life, it still functions marvellously. :)


Nitrogen gas you mean? I am not aware of any reaction between nitrogen compounds in the gaseous state (apart from oxides and other inorganics) that would react naturally with rainwater without a catalyst. The reason I ask is because:

too much water will leach out your nitrates.

OR

if you don't have holes, then it will bog the water and cause bacteria that respire using the breakdown of nitrates to produce oxygen, therefore losing your nitrates.

#5
Matasanos

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the compost bin, have a lot holes around of them, and have a hole to drain the water and leachate... and im just add water once per mounth, around 1lt on each compost... i have another compost wich is a plastic box of vegetables that come packaged, which only covers it with mosquito nets and are added one by one, thus producing compost in ascending .. then I put the photos ...




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