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The $600 dollar canadian gaming rig

Posted by OnionKnight, 11 February 2010 · 800 views

Both of us are complete noobs so when we actually got this to work, we were honestly surprized.

Here is the computer me and my friend built under $600. Was it the best rig? No definitely not. $600 dollars Canadian was his budget so DDR3 ram and compatible motherboard was out of the question he said (only would have costed him an extra $50 bucks more for a ddr3 mobo version of this and ocz 4gig ddr3 ram). The motherboard though was said to be pretty decent for a low end board (its not ASUS material, but it is still pretty good for the price we paid) and the ram was on sale so we said what the heck.


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We also went with the AMD brand for the processor and got us the cheapest quad core on the market (AMD II x 4 620) and the stock cooling that came with it (so if he wants to overclock in the future, he will have to put down some cash). As complete noobs, we went for the cheapest lol. Looked at some reviews online (dunno if you can trust online reviews but better than nothing), and said it was pretty good for the price.

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Also the case was surprizingly good for $25 bucks. 3 fans 1 120mm and 2 90 mm (the 120 and 1 90 had red led lights). Fit was alright too and yes it did pull the hot air out of the case quite nicely (for a cheap case, it was pretty good. Not the best but good enough for sure). Heck it is even wide enough to fit any heat sink

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Video card was XFX Radeon HD 4870 750MHZ 1GB 3.6GHZ GDDR5 PCI-E 2XDVI HDCP Video Card

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The 500w Powersupply was returned though. Although 500W was the bare minimum for HD 4870 (according to ATI) and it was a thermatake brand PSU (OCZ and Thermatake are the brands he trust), he had a PCI wireless adapter, sound card, external hard drive and some other utlities helped eat the wattage. Also the AMD II x4 quad core processer didn't help either (it isn't really what you would call "power friendly"). SO you can say we were definitely worried that the video card wouldn't hold up when put under stress. We used the power supply calc lite http://extreme.outer...culatorlite.jsp to get a general gist of the power that is required to run it. But it doesn't tell you the range of the wattage it would take when under stress

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We tried it out for a couple of his games like LFD2 and MW2 on the highest settings and got no problem whatsoever (unsure how much stress those games put on the card). But to be on the safe side he decided to return the 500W PSU, get store credit and throw in $20 bucks more for a OCZ ModXstream pro 700W.

So it would work for under $600 but if you want to be safe, throw 20 dollars more and get a more powerful PSU.

Here is what he bought:

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It works for him, and i am surprized we put it together no problem. Especially since we didn't have any clue what would be the best things to get. We aren't really the most computer savy individuals so whatever works, works lol. Probably someone like Tulsageoff can find even better deals for a better price and a better build =D.




Very nice rig when you woold have build this 1,5 year ago when card came out you woold have paied 2 times this amount :) thst cos everyone want the new 5 series for directX11 (tjhere are just 2 games for it ) with this rig you can game for at least 4 years with acceptable rates :) woold be nice if you ran 3dmark 06 (its a free download) to compare what you build to others . good luck with it .

Very nice rig when you woold have build this 1,5 year ago when card came out you woold have paied 2 times this amount :) thst cos everyone want the new 5 series for directX11 (tjhere are just 2 games for it ) with this rig you can game for at least 4 years with acceptable rates :) woold be nice if you ran 3dmark 06 (its a free download) to compare what you build to others . good luck with it .


Ty. Its not my rig though. When I get money, i'll probably get the same rig. Who knows maybe by the end of the year i could get something even cheaper and a better build (probably by then ddr3 levels off with ddr2 prices =D)

Next week we are going to have some fun with his old pentium 4 computer and he is going to try to OC it to the max (maybe it will fry lol. I am noob and don't know anything about OCing so he is going to show me before he busts it up). Probably going to need a shit load of fans and some dry ice =D. He said he wants to push it to 8ghz lol
Awesome! Job well done =p
I look forward to building my own in the future :)
I have the 500W version of that same PSU and other than the cables being short I love it. I've had mine running a similar rig with three hard drives and pretty high air overclocks 24/7 on crappy electric for over a year now and I've had zero problems. That 700W will take another 4870 in xfire and a couple more hard drives easily. The 4800 line is so awesome, I got the Sapphire 4830 a little over a year ago for $100 and it does everything I ask it to and hasn't even thought about getting hot yet even in my hot case.

PSU selection is hard, even if you know how to read the labels, but you should be able to get a good idea of how much a PSU can withstand if you know what to look for on the label. When you look at the label, you want to look under the +12V column(s). Each column labeled +12V is a 12 volt rail, which is what feeds most of your computer. You want as few +12V rails as possible, I personally wouldn't buy a PSU that had more than two rails unless it was over 700W. Next, you'll want to look under each +12V column for the amperage each rail can dish out. Amperage is the measure of the amount of electric current passing through a point per second, so the higher these numbers are, the more power your PSU can actually deliver. You need at least 30A total on the 12v rails. Last, you want to look at the number of total watts on the 12v rails. This should be pretty close to the total (85% or better unless you're buying a big PSU).

Now you also have to factor in that a lot of manufacturers falsify their labels somewhat. I'd stick with the following brands: PC Power and Cooling/Silverstone (the Rolls Royces of PSU's), OCZ (who makes PP&C), Corsair, Antec's EarthWatts line, FSP Group, and SeaSonic. You can trust pretty much any power supply from any of those vendors, they use quality components and don't exaggerate their labels as much as some budget companies like Thermaltake and the cheaper Antec lines.

I highly suggest talking to somebody in the industry before buying too. They will have worked with a lot of different units and can give some valuable insight.

Hope somebody found that useful ;)

I have the 500W version of that same PSU and other than the cables being short I love it. I've had mine running a similar rig with three hard drives and pretty high air overclocks 24/7 on crappy electric for over a year now and I've had zero problems. That 700W will take another 4870 in xfire and a couple more hard drives easily. The 4800 line is so awesome, I got the Sapphire 4830 a little over a year ago for $100 and it does everything I ask it to and hasn't even thought about getting hot yet even in my hot case.

PSU selection is hard, even if you know how to read the labels, but you should be able to get a good idea of how much a PSU can withstand if you know what to look for on the label. When you look at the label, you want to look under the +12V column(s). Each column labeled +12V is a 12 volt rail, which is what feeds most of your computer. You want as few +12V rails as possible, I personally wouldn't buy a PSU that had more than two rails unless it was over 700W. Next, you'll want to look under each +12V column for the amperage each rail can dish out. Amperage is the measure of the amount of electric current passing through a point per second, so the higher these numbers are, the more power your PSU can actually deliver. You need at least 30A total on the 12v rails. Last, you want to look at the number of total watts on the 12v rails. This should be pretty close to the total (85% or better unless you're buying a big PSU).

Now you also have to factor in that a lot of manufacturers falsify their labels somewhat. I'd stick with the following brands: PC Power and Cooling/Silverstone (the Rolls Royces of PSU's), OCZ (who makes PP&C), Corsair, Antec's EarthWatts line, FSP Group, and SeaSonic. You can trust pretty much any power supply from any of those vendors, they use quality components and don't exaggerate their labels as much as some budget companies like Thermaltake and the cheaper Antec lines.

I highly suggest talking to somebody in the industry before buying too. They will have worked with a lot of different units and can give some valuable insight.

Hope somebody found that useful ;)


Yus that was extremely helpful actually. Explained quite a bit because my knowledge on PSU's are limited (very. I just know that there are a lot of crappy PSU's out there. Sorta like the stock PSU that came with my case =P. Says 480 W but only puts out barely over 300 hahah). Anyways I went with Antec's Earthwatts line in the end for my PC =D. Thanks for the info your a big help man =P

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